Admin
September 15, 2016
To hear most people tell it, the history of rap goes like this: MCs were originally rapping primarily to showcase their DJs. That is, until Sugar Hill Gang put out "Rapper's Delight" in 1979. It was the second rap record of all time, and an enormous hit, proving there was a market for rapping on wax. From there, Kool Moe Dee battled Busy Bee and changed how rappers could rap, Grandmaster Flash and Melle Mel put out "The Message" - changing what rappers could rap about - and Run-DMC released "Sucker MCs (Krush Groove 1)," which changed how rap could sound. At the start of it all, of course, was DJ Kool Herc's 1973 block party in the Bronx, which effectively birthed hip-hop as we know it. Those are the bullet points, but they don't answer the question: How did rapping get started in the first place? And, what gave birth to the music at block parties like Kool Herc's? There are plenty of awful college music professors who, attempting to shock their students, float the idea that Bob Dylan "invented rap" or was in any way an influence on hip-hop. With all due respect to Jakob Dylan's father, this is not the case at all. Others primarily credit The Last Poets or Gil Scott-Heron. But those theories are flawed too. To get a fuller picture, let's take a few steps back. There were many examples of proto-rapping on '60s and '70s records. While the influence of James Brown on early b-boys and MCs has been well documented, there were other influences as well. Take the tradition of "toasting," a rhyming speech given at urban parties, most popular in Harlem in the late '60s and early '70s. Hip-hop was also greatly influenced by party records. Take Blowfly, the comedian and musician whose 1965 track "Rapp Dirty" is considered by some to be the first rap song. Then there's Rudy Ray Moore, better known as Dolemite, whose dirty rhyme routines over music not only predated Andrew Dice Clay by several decades, but continued the long tradition of rhyming in African culture. Some stories told in rhyme go back for centuries. Moore's "A Signifying Monkey," for example, is his take on the enduring tale of a trash-talking primate. Another famous rendition was by Oscar Brown Jr., a pre-rap poet and singer who was among the first to take traditional African rhyme routines and poems and set them to music. At the end of the day, folks like Moore, Blowfly, and Lightning Rod surely had at least as much influence as their more politically-correct contemporaries. Even if that doesn't sound as safe in a cultural studies thesis.

Admin
September 15, 2016
There's no doubt that listening to your favorite music can instantly put you in a good mood. But scientists are now discovering that music can do more for you than just lift your spirits. Research is showing it has a variety of health benefits. Fresh research from Austria has found that listening to music can help patients with chronic back pain. And a recent survey by Mind - the mental health charity - found that after counselling, patients found group therapy such as art and music therapy, the most useful. Here, we present six proven ways that music can help you and your family's health: 1. CHRONIC BACK PAIN How it helps: Music works on the autonomic nervous system - the part of the nervous system responsible for controlling our blood pressure, heartbeat and brain function - and also the limbic system - the part of the brain that controls feelings and emotions. According to one piece of research, both these systems react sensitively to music. When slow rhythms are played, our blood pressure and heartbeat slow down which helps us breathe more slowly, thus reducing muscle tension in our neck, shoulders, stomach and back. And experts say that apart from physical tension, music also reduces psychological tension in our mind. In other words when we feel pain, we become frightened, frustrated and angry which makes us tense up hundreds of muscles in our back. Listening to music on a regular basis helps our bodies relax physically and mentally, thus helping to relieve - and prevent - back pain. The research: A new study from Austria's General Hospital of Salzburg due to be published in The Vienna Medical Weekly Journal could hold the key to back pain. In the study, 65 patients aged between 21 and 68 with chronic back pain after back surgery were divided into two groups. One group received standard medical care and physiotherapy. The other group also listened to music and received visualization classes for 25 minutes every day for three weeks. Results found that the group who listened to music and used imagery experienced better pain relief than the group who did not. Clinical psychologist Franz Wendtner who led the study says: 'Music is an important part of our physical and emotional well being - ever since we were babies in our mother's womb listening to her heartbeat and breathing rhythms. 'Listening to music for about 25 minutes everyday for at least ten days can help prevent back pain and also make you sleep better.' Which type of music is best? Experts believe any type of classical music such as Mozart or Beethoven can help relieve muscle pain. Calm, slow music is also thought to help. 2. IMPROVES YOUR WORKOUT How it helps: Experts say listening to music during exercise can give you a better workout in several ways. Scientists claim it can increase your endurance, boost your mood and can distract you from any discomfort experienced during your workout. The research: Dr Robert Herdegen of America's Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked at the effects of 12 men riding a bicycle for ten minutes while listening to music on one day. He compared it to the same men riding bicycles without music for ten minutes the following day. On the days that the men exercised listening to music, they traveled 11 per cent further - compared to the days they didn't listen to music. Researchers also found that the men's levels of exertion were at their lowest when listening to music. Other studies show that listening to music releases endorphin - our natural 'feel good' hormones that lift our mood and give us motivation to carry on longer with exercise. Which type of music is best? The best type of music for exercise is thought to be high energy, high tempo music such as hip hop or dance music. 3. MEMORY LOSS How it helps: For many people suffering from memory loss the spoken language has become meaningless. Music can help patients remember tunes or songs and get in touch with their history. This is because the part of the brain which processes music is located next to memory. The research: Researchers from Norway's Sogn Og Fjordane College compared the effects of live, taped and no music on three different groups of people suffering from post traumatic amnesia - or memory loss. The patients were exposed to all three conditions, twice over six consecutive days. Results showed that when patients listened to live or taped music, two thirds of them showed significantly reduced symptoms of anxiety and enhanced orientation, compared to the group that didn't listen to music. Which type of music is best? Research shows that people with memory loss respond best to music of their choice.

Admin
September 15, 2016
So you’ve taken the excruciating steps it takes to express yourself visually and made yourself a professional video. Your next move is making sure that people see it. Below are 8 ways to optimize your video’s potential on YouTube. 1. Titles Are Everything The single biggest contributing factor to your success on a video click through will be related to how you title your video. Make sure that the title of each of your videos is short — Approx. 65 – 70 characters is a good target range as many people will be viewing from hand-held devices and YouTube will cut you off at 100. Also, use the word “video” in the title as people may be searching for videos when they are searching outside of the YouTube platform (like on Google). Be captivating: create a title that will make the viewer want to watch. However, remember that it must relate back to the actual video. Having a short and sweet title is key. If you are titling a video of a cover you did, try this format (as applicable): [Song Title] [Short Description] [Original Artist Name] [Your Band Name] For example, if you have done a cover song of “We Are Never Getting Back Together”, a great title would be: We Are Never Getting Back Together, Taylor Swift Cover by Sasha Think of what people might ask when searching for something. Questions begin with Who, What, When, Where and Why – so when applicable, answer these questions right in the title! On August 28th, when I YouTubed We Are Never Getting Back Together in the search bar this is what I saw: First you see Taylor Swift’s official video, followed by two other videos before her official lyric video! TIP: There are times when official artist videos are not licensed to view in other countries. Where the official video is not available for viewing, yours may be the first (or only) option for a fan in that area to listen to the song! 2. Write a description to your video that has RELEVANT INFORMATION! It’s important for your video description to have keywords that improve your ability to show up in fan (and potential fan) searches. While it should be thorough enough to include all necessary information, avoid wordiness. FUN FACT: There’s a tool that helps you come up with relevant keywords; available straight from the source! CLICK HERE TO USE YOUTUBE’S KEYWORD SUGGESTION TOOL Remember that only a portion of your video description is displayed before your viewer has to press a drop-down menu for more information, so list the most important information at the top. 3. Tag and Categorize your video! Choose a category that best fits your video for most of you – most likely, it will be music. Tags further support your search rank and are a part of the equation to better visibility. Use short phrases and descriptive keywords here– YouTube will auto-generate some from the way you titled your video. Add and remove as you feel necessary. Make sure your brand or artist name is a tag, also. 4. Is Your Thumbnail Amazing? Keep in mind that the thumbnail is the total visual representation people will see first when you share your video onto socials. An interesting image will compel people to click and view. YouTube allows you to choose from 3 thumbnails. Select the one that is the most compelling. If your channel is verified, you can upload a custom thumbnail. Make sure your thumbnail has some text, and a clear image that conveys what your video is about. TIP: Use Google Adwords Keyword Planner to research what people are searching for before you write your descriptions and title your videos – https://adwords.google.com/KeywordPlanner 5. Use the Annotations to promote a Call to Action! The reason you make videos is not simply to get views. The purpose is to get people to take an action, whether that action is to listen to you on Spotify, follow you on socials, donating to your crowdfunding campaign, or buying music. Always include one Call to Action (CTA) in every video you post. A CTA could be “Donate to my campaign,” “follow us on Twitter,” “subscribe,” “ or “visit our site.” Include only ONE CTA in each video you post, so you don’t confuse your audience. 6. Monetize your video! If you own the rights to the music used in your video OR have licensed the song you have covered, you can MONETIZE your video. Just be careful to make sure you are legally allowed to collect money for your content. For guidelines on what is and is not appropriate to monetize, check out YouTube’s Guide. 7. Publish and start promoting your video! You have spent all this time optimizing the metadata (yeah you have created metadata– bet you didn’t even know that is what you were doing!) to make sure it can be found, now it is time to publish your video and start sharing it with your fans. Share your video with communities who share similar interests, as well, to find new fans. Is your video similar or inspired by another YouTube video? Add a positive comment in that video and ask viewers to check out yours, too! 8. Analyze and adjust! Is what you have uploaded not meeting your goals or expectations? Take a look at your title, tags, and description and make edits, if needed– you can edit these items any time you want! Maybe try a different type of video for your next upload.